Activity and research directory projects

The directory lists antimicrobial resistance (AMR) activities and research and displays whether they are in progress or completed. Use the filters and search to help refine your query.

16 activities or research projects found
  • 29 October 2020
    OUTBREAK is AI-powered platform technology designed to track, trace, and tackle AMR. The transdisciplinary team from 15+ organisations are generating and collating new and disparate data-streams from humans, animals, plants and the environment to address the location-specific and person-specific threat of a drug-resistant infection. OUTBREAK will: inform new solutions and tools across the One Health spectrum, reduce hospital admissions, healthcare costs and more.
    The OUTBREAK consortium is led by the University of Technology Sydney. Collaborators include: CSIRO, University of Wollongong, University of South Australia, University of Newcastle, NSW Government (Department of Primary Industries and Department of Health – Illawarra Shoalhaven Local Health District), Sax Institute, Quadram Institute of Biosciences (UK), Southern IML Pathology (now part of Sonic Healthcare Ltd), Microba, MicroGEM (UK), Mimesis and Oracle.
  • 18 August 2020
    Our team is developing a One Health surveillance system for Fiji to identify AMR hot spots. The system will help inform intervention strategies, increase national research capacity across multiple sectors, develop risk and socio-economic evaluation frameworks, recommend sustainable AMR management policies, and educate the public. This is funded by the Australian Centre for International Agricultural Research and the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade Indo-Pacific Centre for Health Security.
    CSIRO, UTS, UniSA, Fiji Ministry of Health and Medical Services, Fiji Ministry of Agriculture, Fijian National Antimicrobial Resistance Committee, and Fiji National University.
  • 2 June 2020
    Communicable Diseases Intelligence (CDI) is a peer-reviewed scientific journal published by the Office of Health Protection, Department of Health. The journal aims to disseminate information on the epidemiology, surveillance, prevention and control of communicable diseases of relevance to Australia.
    Office of Health Protection, Australian Government Department of Health
  • 15 April 2020
    Avian pathogenic E. coli (APEC) is a cause of poultry mortality and disease and poses a major economic threat to poultry farming. It may also pose a risk to human health and is linked with urinary tract infections and sepsis. As the first to provide whole genome sequence data on APEC in Australia, Ausgem has found that Australian APEC carry few antimicrobial resistance genes unlike APEC found overseas. This highlights the effectiveness of Australia’s strict regulation of antimicrobial use in agriculture.
    AusGEM (Partnership between University of Technology and NSW Department of Primary Industries).
  • 15 April 2020
    Intensive pig production introduces a significant number of bacteria, most notably E. coli, into the environment through pig faeces. E. coli can cause illness in both humans and livestock and poses a risk to the profitability of animal agriculture. By performing whole genome sequencing of E. coli and the other microbes frequently found in pigs, AusGEM is helping track the spread of resistance genes through agriculture, humans, and the environment.
    University of Technology and NSW Department of Primary Industries Partnership (AusGEM)
  • 27 June 2019
    We have engaged with partners in Wenzhou, China to analyze the recent rise in AMR in their hospitals. In 2019, we opened the Monash BDI-WMU Alliance in Clinical and Experimental Biomedicine on the campus of Wenzhou Medical University. Initial assessments of one species of bacteria reveals that 15 years ago, less than ten patients per annum were infected, all of which responded to off the shelf antibiotics. Last year, 990 patients had infections s, with ~1 in 3 being AMR.
    Biomedicine Discovery Institute, Monash University, Australia.
    Wenzhou Medical University, China.
  • 5 July 2018
    This project is an initiative of WARRA, the Wollongong Antimicrobial Resistance Research Alliance. This project aims to develop and investigate the psychometric properties of a questionnaire measuring factors contributing to antibiotic use within the community, utilising the Theory of Planned Behaviour as a means of predicting problematic behaviour with antibiotics and informing future intervention strategies.
    University of Wollongong
  • 5 July 2018
    WARRA, the Wollongong Antimicrobial Resistance Research Alliance, has developed a workshop series initiative with the aim of engaging pharmacists in the Illawarra Shoalhaven region. The workshop series will provide a continuing professional development (CPD) accredited platform for pharmacists to engage with researchers regarding antibiotic use and antimicrobial resistance.
    University of Wollongong
  • 5 July 2018
    This project is an initiative of WARRA, the Wollongong Antimicrobial Resistance Research Alliance. This project aims to identify the trends in antimicrobial resistance over a 10 year period across the Illawarra Shoalhaven region for organisms including staphylococcus aureus, escherichia coli, klebsiella pneumonia, enterobacter spp, pneumococcus and haemophilus influenza. It further aims to determine the evolution of antimicrobial resistance in an individual over time.
    University of Wollongong, Illawarra Shoalhaven Local Health District, NSW Health Pathology, Southern IML
  • 5 July 2018
    This project is an initiative of WARRA, the Wollongong Antimicrobial Resistance Research Alliance. The project aims to examine the relationship between antimicrobial resistance and patient health care service utilisation rates and clinical outcomes across the Illawarra Shoalhaven region. It is hypothesized that antimicrobial resistance is associated with higher utilization of health care resources and with poorer outcomes.
    University of Wollongong, Illawarra Shoalhaven Local Health District, in collaboration with Centre for Health Research Illawarra Shoalhaven Population

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