Activity and research directory projects

The directory lists antimicrobial resistance (AMR) activities and research and displays whether they are in progress or completed. Use the filters and search to help refine your query.

6 activities or research projects found
  • 18 August 2020
    Our team is developing a One Health surveillance system for Fiji to identify AMR hot spots. The system will help inform intervention strategies, increase national research capacity across multiple sectors, develop risk and socio-economic evaluation frameworks, recommend sustainable AMR management policies, and educate the public. This is funded by the Australian Centre for International Agricultural Research and the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade Indo-Pacific Centre for Health Security.
    CSIRO, UTS, UniSA, Fiji Ministry of Health and Medical Services, Fiji Ministry of Agriculture, Fijian National Antimicrobial Resistance Committee, and Fiji National University.
  • 15 April 2020
    Avian pathogenic E. coli (APEC) is a cause of poultry mortality and disease and poses a major economic threat to poultry farming. It may also pose a risk to human health and is linked with urinary tract infections and sepsis. As the first to provide whole genome sequence data on APEC in Australia, Ausgem has found that Australian APEC carry few antimicrobial resistance genes unlike APEC found overseas. This highlights the effectiveness of Australia’s strict regulation of antimicrobial use in agriculture.
    AusGEM (Partnership between University of Technology and NSW Department of Primary Industries).
  • 15 April 2020
    Ausgem is using genomic sequencing to characterise Escherichia coli that cause urinary tract infections and sepsis in Australian hospitals. Our studies are focussing on the carriage of mobile antimicrobial resistance (AMR) genes and virulence genes in these cohorts and comparing these elements with those circulating in food production systems and from environmental and wildlife sources enabling policy makers to make informed regulatory choices regarding antimicrobials and biosecurity.
    AusGEM (Partnership between University of Technology and NSW Department of Primary Industries).
  • 1 September 2018
    Antimicrobial Resistance: Science, Communication and Public Engagements (AMR-scapes) is funded by an Australian Research Council Discovery Project grant (DP170100937) to research public engagements with advice regarding the rational and reduced use of antibiotics. The project is led by Mark Davis, Andrea Whittaker, Mia Lindgren (Monash University), Monika Djerf-Pierre (University of Gothenburg and Monash University), and Paul Flowers (Glasgow Caledonian University).
    Monash University
  • 5 July 2018
    With regional, rural and metropolitan areas and a well-defined coastal strip with a relatively stable population base, the Illawarra Shoalhaven region provides an ideal population to position itself as the ‘Framingham’ of antimicrobial resistance. This large scale project specifically aims to build a longitudinal study across the Illawarra Shoalhaven region to determine all of the factors that are drivers of antimicrobial resistance and to provide a platform for test interventions.
    University of Wollongong, Illawarra Shoalhaven Local Health District
  • 24 April 2018
    The National Centre for Antimicrobial Stewardship (NCAS) is a health services research program that aims to generate evidence on antimicrobial use and stewardship, influence national policy to promote judicious use of antimicrobials across human and animal health, and improve knowledge and build workforce capacity among all stakeholders. NCAS’ research streams include: tertiary hospitals, rural and regional hospitals, aged care homes, general practice, and veterinary and agricultural medicine.
    National Centre for Antimicrobial Stewardship; University of Melbourne; Royal Melbourne Hospital; Peter Doherty Institute for Infection and Immunity; Monash University.