Activity and research directory projects

The directory lists antimicrobial resistance (AMR) activities and research and displays whether they are in progress or completed. Use the filters and search to help refine your query.

18 activities or research projects found
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  • 1 September 2018
    Antimicrobial Resistance: Science, Communication and Public Engagements (AMR-scapes) is funded by an Australian Research Council Discovery Project grant (DP170100937) to research public engagements with advice regarding the rational and reduced use of antibiotics. The project is led by Mark Davis, Andrea Whittaker, Mia Lindgren (Monash University), Monika Djerf-Pierre (University of Gothenburg and Monash University), and Paul Flowers (Glasgow Caledonian University).
    Monash University
  • 7 August 2018
    This PhD research project is aimed at investigating alternative regulatory and funding models for antimicrobial drugs. The current economic model (where sales volumes and price determine the return on investment for a drug) does not foster appropriate antimicrobial use. Financial risks associated with AMR has resulted in a decline in the marketing of new drugs & insecurity of supply of current antimicrobials. This project is focused on the Australian market within a global context.
    University of Adelaide
  • 5 July 2018
    This project is an initiative of WARRA, the Wollongong Antimicrobial Resistance Research Alliance. This project aims to develop and investigate the psychometric properties of a questionnaire measuring factors contributing to antibiotic use within the community, utilising the Theory of Planned Behaviour as a means of predicting problematic behaviour with antibiotics and informing future intervention strategies.
    University of Wollongong
  • 5 July 2018
    This project is an initiative of WARRA, the Wollongong Antimicrobial Resistance Research Alliance. This project aims to identify the trends in antimicrobial resistance over a 10 year period across the Illawarra Shoalhaven region for organisms including staphylococcus aureus, escherichia coli, klebsiella pneumonia, enterobacter spp, pneumococcus and haemophilus influenza. It further aims to determine the evolution of antimicrobial resistance in an individual over time.
    University of Wollongong, Illawarra Shoalhaven Local Health District, NSW Health Pathology, Southern IML
  • 5 July 2018
    This project is an initiative of WARRA, the Wollongong Antimicrobial Resistance Research Alliance. The project aims to examine the relationship between antimicrobial resistance and patient health care service utilisation rates and clinical outcomes across the Illawarra Shoalhaven region. It is hypothesized that antimicrobial resistance is associated with higher utilization of health care resources and with poorer outcomes.
    University of Wollongong, Illawarra Shoalhaven Local Health District, in collaboration with Centre for Health Research Illawarra Shoalhaven Population
  • 5 July 2018
    With regional, rural and metropolitan areas and a well-defined coastal strip with a relatively stable population base, the Illawarra Shoalhaven region provides an ideal population to position itself as the ‘Framingham’ of antimicrobial resistance. This large scale project specifically aims to build a longitudinal study across the Illawarra Shoalhaven region to determine all of the factors that are drivers of antimicrobial resistance and to provide a platform for test interventions.
    University of Wollongong, Illawarra Shoalhaven Local Health District
  • 24 April 2018
    The National Centre for Antimicrobial Stewardship (NCAS) is a health services research program that aims to generate evidence on antimicrobial use and stewardship, influence national policy to promote judicious use of antimicrobials across human and animal health, and improve knowledge and build workforce capacity among all stakeholders. NCAS’ research streams include: tertiary hospitals, rural and regional hospitals, aged care homes, general practice, and veterinary and agricultural medicine.
    National Centre for Antimicrobial Stewardship; University of Melbourne; Royal Melbourne Hospital; Peter Doherty Institute for Infection and Immunity; Monash University.
  • 16 November 2017
    CO-ADD is a not-for-profit initiative led by academics at The University of Queensland. Our goal is to screen compounds for antimicrobial activity for academic research groups for free. Compounds are tested against five key bacterial pathogens and two fungi. Researchers with positive results can publish or patent their findings, and can get further advice on compound development. We aim to help researchers worldwide to find new, diverse compounds to combat drug-resistant infections.
    Institute for Molecular Bioscience, The University of Queensland

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